RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Discussions on using the professional data recovery program R-STUDIO for RAID re-construction, NAS recovery, and recovery of various disk and volume managers: Windows storage spaces, Apple volumes, and Linux Logical Volume Manager.
kellogs
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:59 pm

RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Post by kellogs » Mon May 12, 2014 5:00 am

Dear all,

I need to recover the RAID 0 system of a VAIO-AR71ZU.
This is a harware RAID 0 defined in BIOS and The OS is Windows 7.
The RAID is NOT managed by Windows software RAID.
The disc system should be NTFS.

I don't have access to the discs (yet).

The RAID array contains YEARS of work of a professionnal photographer
and I would like to prepare the recovery session the best I can.

One of the Two hard drives is broken and its controller is being replaced by a technician this week.
It should reboot and if not, I plan to use R-studio for Linux to rebuild the lost RAID 0.

Are there any tips I should know about hardware RAID0 repair under a Vaio system?

Kind regards,
Kellogs
(registered and happy user for more than 2 years)

Alt
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Re: RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Post by Alt » Mon May 12, 2014 5:41 am

Well, the thing most important for RAID0 recovery is the fact that if data from one disk is gone, the entire data is gone, too.
So, if the problem is only in the controller, you should be able to recover data without R-Studio, if data is damaged on the disk too, there may be serious problems. And I don't see other problems yet.

Corsari
Posts: 131
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:18 am

Re: RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Post by Corsari » Thu May 15, 2014 1:48 am

@ kellogs

disks may go bad in various flavours

can you better describe its behaviours?

Is it sounding bad?
Listen carefully the startup moment and the next 3 up to 5 seconds, if after the spin up it goes clicking, shut it down immediately, instead, if since the very first instant right after power on it makes a weird siren intermittent sound, its spindle is stuck.

If none of the two situations are the case, and hopefully the drive spins up and makes "normal" sounds, e.g. you can compare its sound with the one of the other drive, the drive may have hundreds/thousands of bad sectors or firmware issues.
The latter two issues, with the right devices and knowledge, may be managed with a good ratio of recovered sectors (as RAID 0 you want to recover as many sectors as possible), also the stuck spindle (a clean room is needed and also some specific tools, otherwise heads my got broken, the drive may goes to vibrate and it will never initialize any more, while contaminating the disk chamber will avoid the full cloning process or even not permit the initialization of the drive) may be solved and allow a very good amount of saved/cloned sectors.

Only the clicking scenario may turn the things really sad and bad.

Regards
Robert
Technical Manager @ Recupero Dati RAID FAsTec (Italy)

USEFUL RULES and GUIDELINES
1) What to check BEFORE begin a disk image/clone process [link]
2) Disks that are too slow while imaging/cloning them [link]
3) All my posts on this forum [link]

kellogs
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:59 pm

Re: RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Post by kellogs » Sun May 18, 2014 2:49 am

Thank you for your answers. After changing the electronic controller from disc, it appears to be a RAID issue (according to the person who changed the disc). Assembling in the BIOS does not work. So is it still possible to reassemble the RAID array in r-TT?

One thing for sur I will only work with the disc images, not the disc themselves and perform a DD first.

Where is the geometry of the RAID0 system stored generally?

Kind regards, Kellogs

Alt
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Posts: 2271
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2008 2:13 pm
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Re: RAID0 recovery on VAIO-AR71ZU

Post by Alt » Mon May 19, 2014 5:19 am

Yes, you may create a virtual RAID0 in R-Studio. This free program ReclaiMe Free RAID Recovery can help in finding RAID geometry. It can work with images, although the images should be of the byte-by-byte image type, rather than the R-Drive Image type. And that might require a lot of disk space.

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